The truth about ‘Half-Truths’

Like the discoveries of penicillin and vulcanization, I arrived at my ‘Half-Truths’ process via experimentation and accident.

For two weeks, I had wanted to photograph the ornamental gourds that I had purchased at the Farmers’ Market. I wasn’t expecting to make art. I just wanted to study the lines, colors and textures - to be thinking about still-life photography. So, when I finally got around to working with them on the kitchen counter, in front of what I call my “window of opportunity”, because many great things, (food, beverages, and photos) have been created there, I did just that. It was a rough start, though. The lighting was not that dramatic. The background was everything else that is on the counter. It just didn’t feel right; so, I decided to find out what things looked like in grayscale.

Instead of running upstairs, waiting for my computer to boot-up, importing files, etc., I started navigating my compact, travel camera’s effects menu. Anyone who has experienced this type of avoidable menu knows that the effects are shown live on the screen as you step through the list. One of the effects before the black and white effect, an effect I knew I would NEVER USE, instantly made the curved lines and colors of the gourds merge at the center of the screen. My subconscious passion for geometry was set aflame by “Reflection”, an effect that mirrors one side of the frame to the opposing side - like a Rorschach Test ink blot. As I subtly rotated and repositioned the camera, the evolving symmetry allowed me to find and create basic shapes, like hearts and wings, then, the face of a demon. This effect was triggering pareidolia. My mind’s eye was, truly, seeing things. I became obsessed with this magic!

After creating several still-life “portraits” with multiple gourds, I decided to explore other fruits, vegetables and objects via the same process, but, in different ways. It became a game to make art through a live, “forced” symmetry, one that I would take al the way to the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, NL.

TO BE CONTINUED…

THE FOLLOWING IS STILL UNDER CONSTRUCTION

 
 
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Where It All Began - Ornamental Gourds on the Kitchen Counter

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The Illuminated Muse - Torn Citrus and Dried Fruits and Vegetables on a Makeshift Light Table

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Honoring the Spirit of Old Trees with Literal Faces - Starting in Amsterdam, NL

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